IDENTIFICATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY REAGENTS FOR USE IN THE STUDY OF THE IMMUNE RESPONSE TO INFECTIOUS AGENTS IN CAMEL AND WATER BUFFALO
Journal Year: 2006
Journal Month: December
Published On: 11-10-2018 07:06:00
Article DOI:

Abdelaziz A. Mosaad1, Abdel Rahman Elbagory2, Adel M. Khalid3, W. Ray Waters4,Ahmed Tibary5, Mary J. Hamilton6 and William C. Davis6
1Department of Bacteriology, Immunology, and Mycology and 2Department of Food Hygiene and Control,
College of Veterinary Medicine, Minufya University, Minufya, Egypt; 3Department of Microbiology, Moshtohor, Zagazig University, Benha Branch, Kaliobia, Egypt; 4National Animal Disease Centre, Agricultural Research Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Ames, Iowa, USA; 5Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences and 6Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, Washington State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Pullman, Washington, USA


ABSTRACT


Progress in elucidating the mechanisms regulating the immune response to infectious agents and derived vaccines in domestic species, especially in camels and water buffalo, has been impeded by the lack of monoclonal antibody (mAb) reagents needed to study the immune response in the species of interest. As a first step to address this problem, we conducted a study to determine how many existing mAbs developed against leukocyte differentiation molecules (LDM) in various species recognise conserved epitopes on orthologous (identical) molecules in two or more species of Artiodactyla. Analysis of 490 monoclonal antibodies raised against LDM in cattle, goat, sheep, llama, pig, dog, and human revealed that many epitopes have been conserved on orthologous molecules in the course of evolution in closely related species in the suborder Ruminantia such as in cattle, bison, and water buffalo, and fewer on more distantly related species such as goat and sheep. Only a few of the epitopes conserved in Ruminantia were conserved in the suborders Suiformes (pigs) and Tylopoda (llamas and camels). The highest level of conservation in all suborders was found with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC I) and class II (MHC II) molecules. These findings show the potential as well as the limitations of screening existing mAbs for research in less use studied species. Importantly, the findings also provide further insight into the composition of the immune system in Artiodactyla and factors to be considered when studying the immune response to infectious agents and vaccines in the different suborders of Artiodactyla.
Key words: Buffalo, camel, immune response, infectious agents, monoclonal antibody


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