Camels and Camelids

IN SITU DRY MATTER AND FIBRE DEGRADATION OF SALT TOLERANT SPOROBOLUS GRASS HAY IN CAMELS FED YEAST CULTURE

Journal Edition: December 2003
Article DOI:
Published On: 13-12-2018 06:54

G.A. Alhadrami
Department of Arid Land Agriculture, College of Food Systems,
United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17555 Al Ain, United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.)

ABSTRACT

In situ trial was conducted to investigate the effect of varying levels (0, 20, 50 and 150 g/day) of yeast culture as supplement in camel’s diets on DM and NDF degradation of salt tolerant sporobolus grass (Sporobolus verginicas) and rhodes grass hays. Two mature dromedary camels fitted with rumen fistula were used in four periods (23 day/period). In the first period camels were fed rhodes grass hay and concentrate (no yeast culture). In the second, third and fourth period, camels were fed the same diet plus 20, 50 or 150 g/day yeast. Five grams from each grass were placed into a nylon bags and incubated for 0, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours and placed in rumen. NDF, ADF and ash contents were higher in sporobolus grass. DM disappearance of both grasses increased significantly (P<0.05) when camels received 20 g/day yeast compared to camels received no yeast after the 6 and 12 hours of incubation times. Addition of 20g/day of yeast increased NDF disappearance of sporobolus grass after 6 and 12 hours of incubation compared to all other levels of yeast supplements in both grasses. Feeding camels 20 or 50 g/day yeast improved the degradability of insoluble but degradable DM of sporobolus grass, while increasing the level of yeast supplement to 150 g/day resulted in lower insoluble but degradable DM than that of zero level in both grasses. The dromedary camels may benefit from the yeast culture by improving DM and fibre degradation of grasses especially salt tolerant grasses.
Key words : Degradation, dromedary, dry matter, fibre, rhodes grass, salt tolerant sporobolus grass hay, yeast